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Free audio books in the public domain Article

LibriVox Guide
A guide for Jaws users, written by Chorlton Workshop for hsbp. More guides are available on the Jaws Guides page of the VIP Software Guides website.

Contents
Introduction
Page structure
LibriVox Catalog
Downloading a chapter
Downloading a book
MP3 player keystrokes
Introduction
This is a guide for the LibriVox website, which can be found at www.librivox.org.

LibriVox is a completely voluntary organisation which makes audio recordings of books which are in the public domain, and then makes them available for free. Note that these books are in the public domain in the USA, but LibriVox asks users in other countries to verify the copyright status of a work in that country before downloading, so that copyright laws are not broken.

LibriVox was started in August 2005, and their completely crazy aim is to record all the books in the public domain. The books available include novels, poetry and non-fiction. Some of the books are read by a single person, others have chapters read by different people.

The recordings can be downloaded in a number of ways, including as podcasts and bit torrents, but this guide only covers using the standard download facility of your web browser. You can download either individual chapters or an entire book. The guide includes instructions both for Internet Explorer and Firefox running under Windows XP

The recordings are all available in mp3 format, and so you can use Windows Media Player, or another media player to listen to them. Note that RealPlayer often cuts off the last few seconds of the recordings.

Page structure
This is the overall structure of the pages on the LibriVox website:

Banner across the top. This contains the text “LibriVox: acoustical liberation of books in the public domain”, but it’s invisible to Jaws users.
Main content.
Navigation. This includes the following subsections which each have a level 2 heading:
LibriVox free audio books. Information about LibriVox.
LibriVox Links. This includes a link to the catalog.
LibriVox Catalog
In the LibriVox catalog, each book has its own web page, and we’ll call these pages book pages. This section describes how to navigate the catalog to find a book page, from where you can download individual chapters or the entire book.

To get to the main page of the LibriVox catalog from any page on the website do one of the following:

Move to the “LibriVox Links” level 2 heading in the navigation section. Then open the “our catalog” link in the list of links which follows the heading.
Use the links list dialog (INSERT + F7) to find the “our catalog” link, and open it.
There’s also a link to the LibriVox catalog near the beginning of the main content on the home page of the website.

Catalog main page
The title of the catalog main page is “LibriVox: Search LibriVox Audiobooks”, and the level two heading of the content section is Search LibriVox Audiobooks.

The catalog main page contains form controls for a title and/or author search, and the following list of links for alternative searching or browsing:

Browse Entire Catalog
Recently Cataloged
More Search Options
The following sections will describe some of these methods of searching and browsing.

Title and/or author search
The catalog main page contains four form controls for a title and/or author search:

Title edit box.
Author edit box.
Status combo box. This lets you specify the status of the books that are found in the search. The options are: Any, Complete, In progress, Open, Fully subscribed, and Proof Listening. You’ll probably be only interested in complete books, and the following description will assume this setting.
Search button.
You can use the quick navigation key E to quickly find the edit boxes (or F for next form control, if you have an older version of jaws). You can enter text in one or both of the edit boxes, and partial words are allowed. After pressing the search button, you’re taken to a page of results, which has the title “LibriVox: Search Results”. The format of this page depends on whether there are more than 40 matches.

If there are no more than 40 matches, then there is a single results page, and the contents section of this page contains:

a level 2 heading: the number of matches.
a level 3 heading: complete works.
A numbered list of the results. Each item in the list consists of two links: the author and title of the work, which is a link to a book page; a readers link which takes you to information about the readers of the book. It’s useful to use the quick navigation key I to navigate through the list, as this means that you don’t have to keep on listening to Jaws saying the readers link.
A level 2 heading, Search again, followed by the form controls needed to do another title and/or author search.
If there are more than 40 matches, then your taken to the first of a number of results pages. The content section of this page contains:

A level 2 heading: Showing matches 1-40 out of some number.
A series of numbers which are links to all the results pages.
A level 3 heading: Complete works.
A numbered list of results which has the same format as described above when there was only a single results page.
A repeat of the series of numbers which are links to all the pages of the results. If you’re in the middle of the previous list of results and you want to move to another page then the keystroke > (which is shift + .) which steps you out of an element is useful for moving quickly to this series of links.
A level 2 heading, Search again, followed by the form controls needed to do another title and/or author search.
Browse entire catalog
If you open the Browse the entire catalog link on the catalog main page, this is equivalent to doing a title and/or author search with no text in the title and author edit boxes, and the status set to complete. You’re taken to the first of a number of results pages which contain all the complete books in the catalog.

Recently Cataloged
If you open the Recently Cataloged link on the catalog main page, then you’re taken to a page whose content section contains the level 2 heading what’s new. Below this heading are a series of links to the book pages of recently cataloged books.

Book page
The title of a book page is “LibriVox » book title, book author”, and the level 2 heading of the content section is the book title.

This is an overview of the main content:

Book title.
The name of the author.
A brief outline of the book.
A list of online resources for the book. One of the items is a link to a zip file of the entire book.
The total runtime.
The name of the reader.
A list of the chapters of the book. Each item in the list consists of the chapter name, followed links to audio files in 3 different formats or quality.
Downloading a chapter
On a book page:

Move to the list of chapters, which is the second list on the page, and immediately follows the text “mp3 and ogg files”.
Each item in the list consists of the chapter name, followed by three links to audio files for the chapter which are in different formats or sound quality. To move through the chapters it’s useful to use the quick navigation key I, to move through the items in the list ( assuming you have a recent version of jaws ). Find the chapter which you want to listen to.
It’s normally best to use the first audio file — the reasons are given at the end of the section. To open an audio file with your default mp3 player, just open the link. If you’re using the Firefox browser, a dialog asks whether you want to open or save the file. The default is open, so you can just press ENTER.
The download of the audio file to a temporary folder on your computer starts, and a dialog opens which tells you the progress of the download. When this is complete, your default mp3 player automatically starts playing the audio file. If the download is going to take a while, you can use the computer for something else while you’re waiting — you’ll know when the download is finished, because the audio file will start playing.
As noted above, the mp3 file is downloaded to a temporary folder on your computer. If you want to keep a permanent copy, and you’re using Windows Media Player, you can save the mp3 file by choosing Save Media as… from the File menu.
Choice of audio file
This section just gives the reasons for using the first of the three audio files, so just skip it if you’re not interested. The first two audio files are in the mp3 format and the third in the ogg vorbis format. Mp3 is the more common format, and you’ll be able to listen to the file using either Windows Media Player, or any other media player that you’ve installed on your computer (for example RealPlayer). The digitisation rates of the two mp3 files are 64 kilo bits per second (kbps) and 128 kbps respectively. Sound quality and file size increase with the number of kbps, but for speech 64kbps is fine.

Downloading a book
LibriVox provides a Zip file containing the mp3 files for all the chapters in the book. The file has the extension .zip. The following two sections describe how to download the file using Internet Explorer and Firefox. After these there’s a section on how to listen to the book.

Using Internet Explorer
On a book page:

Find the link “Zip file of the entire book” — you can use the links list dialog to move to the link (INSERT + F7).
Open the shortcut menu for the link, and choose “Save Target As…”.
A Save As dialog opens. The file name will be “book name”_librivox_64kb_mp3.zip. To save the file in your My Documents folder: press ALT + I to open the Save In combo box; press the letter M a number of times till you select My Documents; press TAB to close the combo box, and then press ENTER for the default button, which is Save. For more details on the Save As dialog, including how to save to other folders, see the separate guide on the Open and Save As Dialogs.
A dialog opens, which has the title x% of “file name”, where x is the percentage of the file that has already been downloaded. The file will probably take a while to download. You can do something else, and then switch programs back to the dialog (ALT + TAB) to check the progress.
When the download is complete, the title of the dialog changes to Download complete. Press ENTER to close the dialog.
Using Firefox
On a book page:

Find the link “Zip file of the entire book” — you can use the links list dialog to move to the link (INSERT + F7).
Open the shortcut menu for the link, and choose “Save Link As…”.
A Save As dialog opens. The file name will be “book name”_librivox_64kb_mp3.zip. To save the file in your My Documents folder: press ALT + I to open the Save In combo box; press the letter M a number of times till you select My Documents; press TAB to close the combo box, and then press ENTER for the default button, which is Save. For more details on the Save As dialog, including how to save to other folders, see the separate guide on the Open and Save As Dialogs.
A dialog opens, which has the title x% of 1 file – Downloads, where x is the percentage of the file that has already been downloaded. The file will probably take a while to download. You can do something else, and then switch programs back to the dialog (ALT + TAB) to check the progress.
When the download is complete, the title of the dialog changes to Downloads. Press ESC to close the dialog.
Listening to the book
Windows XP treats a Zip file as a special type of folder — a compressed (zipped) folder. So in Windows Explorer, a zipped folder can appear in the tree view of the folders and disks.

Sometimes it’s necessary to extract the files from a zipped folder before they can be used, but to listen to the mp3 files in a zipped folder, you don’t need to do this. Here are a couple of ways of using Windows Explorer to navigate to the mp3 files:

In the tree view, navigate to the folder containing the zip folder. Press TAB to move to the List view, and select the zip folder. Press ENTER to open it. A new Windows Explorer window opens, in which the Tree view is closed, and the List view contains the mp3 files for the chapters.
In the tree view, navigate to the zip folder. Then press TAB to go to the List view which will be a list of the mp3 files for the chapters.
Select the mp3 file you want to listen to, and press ENTER to open it. A File Download dialog asking you whether you want to open the file may open. If it does, the default is Cancel, so you have to TAB to the Open button and press it. Your default mp3 player opens and starts playing the file.

Mp3 player keystrokes
Below are some useful keystrokes for both Windows Media Player and RealPlayer for listening to mp3 files. As noted in the introduction, RealPlayer often cuts off the last few seconds of recordings.

Windows Media Player
Command Keystroke
Play or pause CTRL + P
Stop CTRL + S
Volume down F9
Volume up F10
Fast forward CTRL+ SHIFT + F

RealPlayer
Command Keystroke
Play or pause CTRL + P
Stop CTRL + S
Volume down CTRL + DOWN ARROW
Volume up CTRL + UP ARROW
Fast forward CTRL + RIGHT ARROW
Rewind CTRL + LEFT ARROW

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